Tuesday, 1 January 2019

The 80s

The 80s

The following photos are from The 80s!! - Digitised Local History Photographs 
from the Moreton Bay Regional Council.

1980 - Aerial view of Bribie Gardens Estate.
MBRC Image P0781

1980 - Aerial view of Bribie Gardens Estate.
MBRC Image P0783

1980 - Bribie Island Library, 31 March 1980.
Photo by Near North Coast News. MBRC Image P0795

1980 - Battery Observation Post on Bribie Island.
Photo by Ronald Powell. MBRC Image P1598

1980 - sample of souvenir fifty cents note printed to celebrate Bribie Island's mock secession
from the mainland on 12 October 1980.
Photo by Lyn Holt. MBRC Image P2153

1980 - Some of the people who participated in Bribie Island's mock secession
from the mainland on 12 October 1980.
Photo by Lyn Holt. MBRC Image P2267

1980s - Bribie Island Information Centre.
Photo by Denny Field. MBRC Image P2040

1987 - Anro Asia aground off Bribie Island in October.
MBRC Image P0784

1987 - Back of the Number 4 Naval Command Buuilding.
Photo by Ronald Powell. MBRC Image P1603

1989 - Aerial view of Bribie Island and Pumicestone Passage.
Highlighted area is the proposed development of Dux Creek.
MBRC Image P0808

1989 - A much-deteriorated wreck of the Cormorant, South Esplanade.
Photo by Ronald Powell.  MBRC Image P1593

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: 
The 80s!! - Digitised Local History Photographs. Moreton Bay Regional Council.


Thursday, 15 November 2018

They Answered the Call

THEY ANSWERED THE CALL

In November 2018 the Bribie Island Historical Society produced a book entitled They Answered the Call.

Click on the name to go to their page from the book They Answered the Call.

FIRST WORLD WAR
M A Bishop 366
W H Bonney 4681
R J Campbell 6477
A T Davis 2792
B Dux 6158
E H Freeman 2987
W Freeman 2809
G L Gollagher 4535
W Gosling 4728
G E Jacques 2188
A Layton 3388
J R Mills 2262
T J Mills 170
W H Mills 944
A W Storr 4891
C A Storr 4892 
H F Storr 653
T M Tripcony 1986


SECOND WORLD WAR
T E Adams Q187167
J M Band
R C Benson QX61294
G H Boothe Q187425
K V Boothe Q267346
W C Costin QX14502
C F Crouch QX27813
M J Darvall QF273914
J A Duke QX9594
W Freeman Q120090
E E I Grant QF268557
D J Heenan 6762
C R Jackson QX52029
W J Lindsay QX13785
A ONeill QX27819
T Shaw QX45157
G H Shields 78860
A Waterfield 76851
G B Wellauer QX30244
R G Wilson Q153131


A Waterfield 78651

The following entry is from They Answered The CallClick here for the contents page.

Alphonso WATERFIELD

Service number: 78651.  Age: 41 years. Enlisted: 21 Sep 1942.
Occupation: Lighthouse keeper, Bribie Island.  Next of kin: (wife) Mrs Annie Waterfield.
Address on enlistment:  Brisbane.

 1945: Consolidated Catalina aircraft moored at Royal Australian
Air Force (RAAF) Rathmines base.[1]

Photo from Alphonso Waterfield’s
service record.

Service Summary:
31 Aug 1943: Motor boat crew, R.A.A.F. Marine Section Served at Amberley, Sandgate, Maryborough and Rathmines.
26 Nov 1945: Discharged.

Life Summary:
Alphonso Waterfield was born 18 Sep 1901 in London, a son of Alphonso Waterfield and Cecelia Salt.

By 1925 he was lighthouse keeper with the Department of Harbours and Marine, Brisbane and operated the light tower on North Bribie Island from 1929 till he enlisted in 1942. Alphonso Waterfield married Annie Emma Cowell (1909-1980) on 7 Feb 1931 and the couple made their home on North Bribie Island.[2]

Back lead light and Keepers house on
North Bribie Island circa 1930.
[3]

By the early 1940s his wife and young family moved to Brisbane. Alphonso Waterfield died 10 Mar 1976 aged 74 and a memorial plaque at Mt Thompson Memorial Gardens records his service with the R.A.A.F. Marine Section.[4]




[1] Courtesy of the Australian War Memorial P11290-001 https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/C2073273
[2] Bridesmaids in Blue. Daily Standard Sat 28 Feb 1931 p. 4 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article180979163
[3] Photo: Bribie Island Historical Society WO9_888056



Friday, 12 October 2018

Story 10 Describing Bribie Island

The following story is one of 27 stories presented in Describing Bribie Island 1865-1965: historical first-hand accounts of visiting Bribie Island produced by the Bribie Island Historical Society in 2017.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: William Main (1860-1946) was born in Glasgow, Scotland and arrived in Queensland in 1887.  In 1911, William was appointed by the Queensland Government to be an Immigration Agent and obtained agricultural emigrants for Queensland. During the 1920s William was associated with the Commercial Travelers’ Club in Elizabeth Street, Brisbane city, and from about this time he contributed verse and other literary articles to The Queenslander, Sydney Mail and other Australian and overseas periodicals.  William spent his retirement years on Bribie Island and according to the Visitors’ Book for Shirley’s Guest House at Ocean Beach, stayed there on 8 December 1939.  Another guest that day was Thomas Welsby.
William Main’s article The Unnamed Lakes was published in The Queenslander, 9 February 1928, page 8 and his photos of The Nameless Lagoons of Bribie on page 31.
---ooo---
The Unnamed Lakes of Bribie by William Main, 1928 (with illustrations)
Unnamed lakes and streams, in these days [1928], belong to the "Never Never"; but they are still to be found on the main beach of Bribie Island, 35 miles from the city of Brisbane.

Historically, Bribie is the most important island in the Bay.  On July 16, 1799, Captain Matthew Flinders landed at Skirmish Point, the first white man to land on Moreton Bay, and this point of Bribie was named by him because of a short and almost harmless engagement he and his boat’s crew had with the natives after landing.  In his sloop Norfolk Flinders made a wonderfully accurate chart of the Bay and islands, but he missed the Brisbane River, which, after an interval of 24 years, was discovered by Oxley.

Map of Bribie Island showing
William Main’s “Unnamed Lakes”.

Source: The Unnamed Lakes of Bribie. The Queenslander, 9 February 1928, p. 8.
   The island was not named.  It simply got to be known as Bribie’s Island, the name of a convict settler who made his home on it for years.

   During recent times the steamers of the Brisbane Tug and Steamship Company have made the island accessible four days a week, and a township has been formed at the jetty, in the passage between the island and the mainland.  This township has been named Bongaree, although the name is unknown to most of the visitors.  The passage itself is a famous fishing ground, and was supposed by the explorers to be the mouth of a river, and consequently was named the Pumicestone River, but is now more commonly known to its frequenters as Bribie Passage.  The scenery and sunsets are beautiful, with fine views of the Glass House Mountains in the background.

   The Tug Company of late years has opened a road across the island to the main beach, and established a motor service.  This is the only road on the island, and as the time between arrival and departure is so short it permits little more than a dip in the surf and lunch at the kiosk before returning to the Passage to join the steamer.

   The main beach, stretching over 20 miles north to Caloundra, is practically undiscovered country.  As far as the eye can reach the beach shows an unbroken fringe of casuarinas.  Behind the casuarinas is thick scrub and timber, which, in the south of the island, stretches from the main beach to the Passage.  The road is through timber all the way.  About three miles north of the road the thick scrub forms but a narrow belt, and beyond, for miles and miles, the island is open country, like a Scottish moor, covered with heath, with occasional clumps of banksia and ti-tree.  Instead of grouse, one starts an odd kangaroo or wallaby, and sometimes an emu.  Dingoes are common, as their tracks prove, right down to the shore; but they are seldom seen in daylight.  In the topmost branches of a dead cypress pine, not far from the open country, is an eagle’s nest of many years’ standing.  There are two young eagles in it as I write, and they are bred by larger eagles than can be found in any other part of the world.
How No. 1 lagoon meets the sea in a wet season.
Photo and caption: W. Main

Source: The Nameless Lagoons of Bribie. The Queenslander, 9 February 1928, p. 31.

The Lagoons
   Three miles along the beach, north from the road, there is a break in the casuarina fringe, and No. 1 lagoon opens out.  It is the smallest of the saltwater lakes, but a fine sheet of water at times.  It has but one arm running into it, from the south.  This arm is over two miles long, and joins up with fresh water lagoons and swamps in the wet season, when it becomes a rushing river, breaking through the sand barrier to the sea.  This lagoon broke through in April last year, after being closed for three years, and the photographs were taken at that time.  There is also a photograph showing it closed up again.
No. 1 lagoon closed from the sea.
Photo and caption: W. Main

Source: The Nameless Lagoons of Bribie. The Queenslander, 9 February 1928, p. 31.

No. 2 lagoon.  Photo and caption: W. Main
Source: The Nameless Lagoons of Bribie. The Queenslander, 9 February 1928, p. 31.
   Two miles north of No. 1 lagoon there is a second gap in the coastline, and one comes on a beautiful sheet of water, which is No. 2 lagoon, the largest of the four lagoons along the main beach.  This lagoon has two large feeders, one stretching south until it almost joins the waters of No. 1 lagoon, and in wet weather, draining swamps and numerous fresh water lagoons that join up to make a river, carrying the accumulated rubbish of the island to the sea.  At such times the ocean changes colour, and becomes a sea of mud and debris along the coastline.

  Sometimes, while the break remains open to the sea, fish rush in, and, when closed, the lagoons are full of bream, whiting, and mullet.  They have always eels.  At the last break the fish were not available, and there are few in any of the lagoons this year.  One whiting, caught in No. 2 last year, measured 18in., and scaled 1 lb. 11 oz.  The flavour of the lagoon fish is inferior to the fish caught in the sea.
No. 2 lagoon looking north.
Photo and caption: W. Main.

Source: The Nameless Lagoons of Bribie. The Queenslander, 9 February 1928, p. 31.

The north branch of No. 3 lagoon.
Photo and caption: W. Main

Source: The Nameless Lagoons of Bribie. The Queenslander, 9 February 1928, p. 31.
   Then, two good miles north of No. 2 lagoon, one reaches the gem of the main beach, No. 3 lagoon.  The permanent water in No. 1 and No. 2 lagoons is dark, like strong billy tea; but the water of No. 3 lagoon is clear as crystal, and makes the finest swimming pool imaginable.  It is not more than 10ft. deep in any part, and there is a beautiful island that one can reach by the aid of a friendly sandbank.  The banks are covered with scrub and beautiful trees, with here and there a group of dark cypress pines, stretching above the surrounding bush and forming a delightful contrast to the lighter shades of green.  

The waters of No. 3 lagoon come mostly from the heathland, and at times there are whiting to be caught, if they are in a biting mood.

No. 4 lagoon.
Photo and caption: W. Main

Source: The Nameless Lagoons of Bribie. The Queenslander, 9 February 1928, p. 31.
  The No. 3 lagoon, the beauty of the bunch, entails a 10-mile walk along the beach; but, when the tide is suitable, the sands are firm, and with a day before one there is no need to hurry.
   
No. 4 lagoon is much the same as No. 2 lagoon.  It has two feeding areas, and is in the neighbourhood where the wild “Christmas bells” bloom in their season.  Unfortunately, “there ain’t no ‘buses running” and it is a long way to carry Christmas bells seven miles, mostly against a south-easter.

   The main beach itself is a mighty attraction, and a plunge in the surf is available at any stage of the journey.  Sometimes there are rare shells to be found; but often the beach is bare.  And what a beach it is – the finest surfing beach in Queensland!  

REFERENCE:
An Unknown Island. The Unnamed Lakes of Bribie published in The Queenslander, Thursday 9 February 1928, page 8
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article22943972  and the photos The Nameless Lagoons of Bribie appear on page 31 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article22943811 of the same issue.

Tuesday, 18 September 2018

Bathing on Bribie during the 1920s

Bathing on Bribie during the 1920s

The following collection of photos show the type of swimming costumes people wore during the 1920s on Bribie Island.


 An Early Morning Dip. 
Sunrise at Bribie finds the holiday-makers astir and eager to begin the day with a constitutional dip. 
The Daily Mail, Mon 1 Jan 1923, p. 7 


There’s no worry at the Seaside.  
The blue waters of the sea at Bribie drive away dull care.
The Daily Mail, Wed 3 Jan 1923 p. 7  


Happy holidaymakers on Bribie Island.
The Daily Mail, Sat 19 Jan 1924, p. 13  


On the Sands at Bribie. 
The lady in the "ring" may claim a prize at The Daily Mail office.
The Daily Mail, Wed 13 Jan 1926, p. 13 

A Bathing Trio - caught by the camera at Bribie. 
The Daily Mail, Wed 13 Jan 1926, p. 13 

Sea Horses - The holiday spirit is nowhere more in evidence that at Ocean Beach, Bribie.
The Daily Mail, Wed 13 Jan 1926, p. 13 




Mr. M.J. Kirwan, M.L.A. officially opening the new bathing shed at Bribie, yesterday.
The Brisbane Courier, Mon 12 Dec 1927 p. 16 




Alexandra Headlands, winners of the life-saving competition at Bribie yesterday.
The Brisbane Courier, Mon 12 Dec 1927 p. 16 


A line up for the photographer at Bribie.
The Brisbane Courier Thu 5 Jan 1928, p. 7 


Scenes of revelry in the surf at Bribie
The Brisbane Courier Mon 9 Jan 1928 p. 16 

REFERENCES:
The following articles available on the National Library of Australia's wonderful newspaper database Trove:

An Early Morning Dip. 
The Daily Mail, Mon 1 Jan 1923, p. 7 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article218983441 

There’s no worry at the Seaside.  The blue waters of the sea at Bribie drive away dull care. 
The Daily Mail, Wed 3 Jan 1923 p. 7 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article218979606 

Happy holidaymakers on Bribie Island. 
The Daily Mail, Sat 19 Jan 1924, p. 13 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article217625870 

Bathers at Bribie. 
The Daily Mail, Wed 13 Jan 1926, p. 13 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article220614564 

Mr. M.J. Kirwan, M.L.A. officially opening the new bathing shed at Bribie, yesterday. 
The Brisbane Courier, Mon 12 Dec 1927 p. 16 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article21203222

Alexandra Headlands, winners of the life-saving competition at Bribie yesterday.
The Brisbane Courier, Mon 12 Dec 1927 p. 16 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page1648091

A line up for the photographer at Bribie. 
The Brisbane Courier Thu 5 Jan 1928, p. 7 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article21211215 

Scenes of revelry in the surf at Bribie. 
The Brisbane Courier Mon 9 Jan 1928 p. 16 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article21212187

Friday, 14 September 2018

1916 Scenes on Bribie by N Langdon

1916 Scenes on Bribie
Photos by N Langdon







The following ten photos appeared in a pictorial supplement of The Queenslander newspaper on 1st January 1916.





General view of the landing place at the
entrance to Pumicestone Passage
Photo: N. Langdon

Looking North up the Passage from the Pier
Photo: N. Langdon

Looking South
Photo: N. Langdon

The Koopa at the Pier
Photo: N. Langdon

The Dining Hall, Store and Caretaker's cottage
Photo: N. Langdon
The Pavilion
Photo: N. Langdon
View inland from the Pavilion
Photo: N. Langdon

Ladies' Bathing house
Photo: N. Langdon


Waves of the Pacific breaking on
the outer beach of Bribie
Photos: N. Langdon









REFERENCE:
Scenes on Bribie. The Queenslander 1 January 1916, page 22.

To access a high resolution copy of page 22, go to State Library of Queensland's online catalogue at:  Queensland Pictorial, Supplement to The Queenslander 1 Jan 1916 

R G Wilson Q153131

The following entry is from They Answered The CallClick here for the contents page.

Robert George WILSON


Service number: Q153131.  Age: 42 years 7 months.  Enlisted: 20 Apr 1942.

Occupation: Motor truck driver.  Next of kin: (sister) Mrs Frances Steinbeck.
Address on enlistment:  Bribie Island.

19 Dec 1944, Toorbul Point. Works Company members participating 
in the march past. The salute was taken by Brigadier H. Wrigley,
Commander 1 Base Sub area.
[1]

Service Summary:
20 Apr 1942: 9 Aust Works Company.

Did not proceed overseas. The 9 Aust Works Coy was employed along the Lines of Communication area of northern New South Wales and southern Queensland.

21 Feb 1946: Discharged.

Life Summary:
Robert Wilson (1899-1971) was born 16 Sep 1899 in Brisbane, the only son of George Wilson (1860-1904) and Frances Williamson Johnstone (1872-1928). By 1926, Robert Wilson was living in the Bribie Island area and took up employment with local fishermen Cec Campbell and Reg Campbell. After Reg Campbell opened his store on South Esplanade in 1932, Robert Wilson (as he had his own truck) made deliveries for Campbell’s store.[2]

After his military service, Robert Wilson returned to Bribie Island and was employed by the Council. Robert Wilson married Bridget Catherine Ryan and by 1968 the couple were living at the Pensioner’s Reserve on Bribie Island. 


Robert Wilson had been associated with Bribie Island for over 50 years when he died 22 Jul 1971, aged 71. He was buried at Toowong Cemetery.


[1] Courtesy of the Australian War Memorial 084373 https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/C82930
[2] Link with Past – obituary for Robert Wilson. The Star (Bribie) v.10(8) 20 Aug 1971, p. 1.